Mother’s Day 2020

“Normally“

Today will be different in so many ways.

Normally we would welcome Mother’s Day morning with open windows and fresh air. I would sip my coffee on the patio while listening to the birds. Not so today in northern Virginia. This morning it was 32 degrees when I awoke, and there was ice in the birdbath. Other neighbors to our north posted videos of snowflakes flying yesterday afternoon. How bizarre considering that last week I turned on the air-conditioner for the first time this season!

Normally we would enjoy a special dinner out with our family, including my mother and brother. This year we are unable to visit Mom in her nursing home due to COVID-19. My brother will drop off flowers and a card for her today, but they must be sanitized before she can enjoy them. And we hope to Facetime with her later, but this year she will not recognize our faces.

Normally, at the end of this day, I would go online and peruse all the photos of moms enjoying life with their kids, visiting grandparents, going out on the town, and dining in restaurants. Today I‘m sure I will see lots of family photos, but in a very different setting.

Adapting

We aren’t doing life “normally” nowadays, but we are adapting to a new way (dare I say, a better way?) of living.

  • Teachers, students and parents have all plunged, albeit reluctantly, into distance learning. (Well done!)
  • High school and college seniors have found unique ways to celebrate their graduations and commencements. (Congratulations!)
  • Military families are streaming commissioning ceremonies online, while demonstrating the importance of contingency planning. 🇺🇸
  • Families are spending more time outdoors, walking, biking, scavenger hunting, gardening, cooking and more. (Shout-out to my friend, Rita, for sharing this photo of a rock she discovered on a recent walk!)
  • Kids and adults alike are taking up new crafts and hobbies, or re-discovering projects they once enjoyed.
  • Churches, including small ones like ours, are streaming services online, reaching beyond their regular attendees. (Visit our Sundays Online page!)
  • And best of all, we are genuinely caring for our neighbors and those who are isolated during this pandemic.

Are you seeing it too?

For me, as a mom, this has been such a challenging, yet hope-filled time, to see everyone caring for one another. There is a lot of background noise in the world of politics and partisanship, but for the rest of us folks, we are just trying to get by. We are working together, at a distance, to make sure everyone has enough to eat. To make sure no one is alone. To make sure our front-line workers know they are appreciated.

We are living the example that Jesus taught.

“By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you love one another.” — John‬ ‭13:35‬

❤️❤️❤️


My Mother’s Day wish:

Don’t let this challenging time fade from your memory. Our doors and windows will swing open again one day soon. When they do, and when we all step outside again, enjoying our old, familiar activities, let’s continue to love and nurture one another.

 

Featured photo by Kelly Sikkema on Unsplash

You Surpass Them All

Happy Mother’s Day!

Today is the very best day to focus on the blessings in my life, and the beautiful family that the Lord has given me.

This will be the most quoted scripture of the day, but Proverbs 31:28-29 sums up the blessings of being a wife and mother . . .

My day began with Sunday worship, followed by a surprise Mother’s Day brunch, alone with my husband.

This was the view from our window seat overlooking a soggy West Market Street from Casa Nostra. (Definitely worth checking out, NoVa friends!)

I neglected to take a photo of my first course Caesar salad, but it set the stage perfectly for the main course of pan-seared salmon with ricotta gnocchi and a pesto cream sauce. And, no Italian brunch would be complete without Tiramisu. It was a decadent meal!

I returned home and was showered with Mother’s Day cards from both children, flowers, goodies and a Kohl’s gift card. (My son knows me well 😉.) And no Mother’s Day would be complete without a long, lazy nap.

My own mother and late mother-in-law are examples of women who deeply loved and sacrificed for their families. They were both raised during the Depression and knew the meaning of hardship. I believe this helped them raise their families on a shoestring budget, while creatively stretching every dollar. They were frugal shoppers, skilled seamstresses, and round-the-clock nurses. Multi-tasking wasn’t a term in the 60’s and 70’s, yet they were the pioneers. Many mothers left their homes when the kids went off to school, and took up careers of their own.

Mother’s Day looked very different when we were kids. I don’t remember bringing Mom breakfast in bed, but she usually got a break from cooking. That meant going out to dinner or ordering takeout, which was a special treat for our family.

And even though it was a holiday in her honor, like all other moms, she still did a lot of the usual tasks that day in preparation for the week ahead. In that spirit, I made my weekly run to Wegman’s today, and am knee-deep in laundry as I type.

So, thank you to all the moms who came before my generation, setting the bar and guiding our feet in paths toward the future. You have inspired us, guided us, and made us proud to bear the title of mother — or mentor — to the children in our lives. 💕